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    Located within The Soda Plant @ Kilburn and Pine Streets in Burlington, Vermont

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    The SPACE Gallery
    266 Pine Street
    Burlington, VT
    spacegalleryvt@gmail.com
    802-578-2512
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    • Call to Artists: 'Small Works' The S.P.A.C.E. Gallery hosts an exhibition each year where every piece gets in!... fb.me/2kUP0Gfhe 4 days ago

Current Exhibition, ‘Don’t Be A Stranger’ by Christy Mitchell & 100th Show at Space!

‘Don’t Be A Stranger’

Annual Solo Exhibition by Gallery Director, Christy Mitchell

It’s The S.P.A.C.E. Gallery’s 100th Month of Continuous Shows!

Exhibition Duration: November 3 – 25, 2017

‘Don’t Be A Stranger’ photography series by Christy Mitchell taken by Luke Awtry

Each November, The Space Gallery Director, Christy Mitchell, recounts her past year with a conceptual solo exhibition in the form of an autobiographical installation using various media. The work is presented in such a way that the viewer may also see themselves in the story line, identifying with broader concepts of social interaction, relationships, and human or cultural experiences.

Manipulated Vintage Rotary Phones by Christy Mitchell

Following 2016’s ‘IRL’, a story about finding love in the digital age, ‘Don’t Be A Stranger’ is a telling of just how arduous dating ‘in real life’ can be. Modern terms such as ‘ghosting’ reference the tired game of waiting by the phone for someone who may never call. Mitchell uses vintage rotary phones, collage, photography, and set design in a palette which compliment a mid-century era noir film aesthetic, a thriller in fact, asking who done it?

‘Don’t Be A Stranger’ photography series by Christy Mitchell taken by Luke Awtry

There is an ever present power flow within the context of the ritual of dating. The one with the power to shoot someone down, the one who takes that power back by denying the dominance of the other….who is holding the gun? …or sent that last message?

The Space Gallery Main Entrance to ‘Don’t Be A Stranger’ by Christy Mitchell

Visit All Month Long During Open Hours: Thursday – Saturday from 12-5pm

Main Exhibition Area at Space Gallery, ‘Don’t Be A Stranger’ Installation by Christy Mitchell

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Call to Artists: ‘Dark Matter’ A Juried October Exhibition

‘Dark Matter’

A Juried Dark Arts Exhibition at The Space Gallery

The S.P.A.C.E. Gallery is thrilled to host our annual ‘dark arts’ exhibition this October with ‘Dark Matter’, juried and curated by gallery director, Christy Mitchell. She relishes in the opportunity to get creepy with you!

‘Dark Matter’, in a scientific sense, has never been directly observed; however, its existence would explain a number of otherwise puzzling astronomical observations. We ask that you consider how existence and puzzling realities…and fantasies, play in to your own work and interpretation of the universe. In a psychological sense….what makes you think, makes you question, terrifies you…or others. Do you find beauty in death, in quiet alleys, and in the dark nights of your soul? Do you feel that we may be in the new ‘dark ages’ with regards to our environment or political climate?

Is your work just simply, beautifully, dark…with seriousness or humor?

Show us. We can’t wait to see.

Applications accepted now until midnight on September 30th, 2017, as we slither into October. Muwahahaha
‘Dark Matter’ Application Form

Art Hop is Here! Art Hop is Here! The S.P.A.C.E. Gallery ‘Represents’!

The 25th South End Art Hop is Here! Sept. 8-10, 2017

The S.P.A.C.E. Gallery and The Soda Plant Host Over 50 Artists, Open Studios, Market Booths…and More!

The South End Art Hop is a celebration of all the creative energy the South End Arts District has to offer! The three day event takes place the weekend after Labor Day each year and falls on September 8th, 9th, and 10th, 2017.



The Soda Plant and The S.P.A.C.E. Gallery
are THE place to visit during Art Hop with hundreds of pieces of artwork, open studios, market booths, and outside events.


ART HOP OPEN HOURS:

Friday, September 8th: 5pm – Midnight
Saturday, September 9th: 10am – 10pm
Sunday, September 10th: 11am – 4pm

Gallery Exhibition:
Open Thursday – Saturdays from 12-5pm, September 8 – 30th, 2017

‘Ascending Mt. Apolonikdt’, collage by Barbee Hauzinger


Who’s Who?? What To Expect:

Open Artist Studios at The Space Gallery:

Frank DeAngelis, acrylics & spray paint
Tim Neiley, oil & acrylic
Chris Dunwoody, photography, collage, and mixed media
Alex Costantino, paintings & ceramics
Mary Lundquist, illustrations, children’s books and prints
Peter Richards, paint, ink and graphite
Jake Rifken, wire sculpture
Martha Hull, acrylic, colored pencil, prints, cards/magnets, dolls
Jeff Bruno, painting, graphite, charcoal, and mixed media
Clay Mohrman, wooden sculpture and lighting design
Anna May Sisk, metal, mixed media, paintings, and sculpture
Mindy Blank, photography, painting, collage
Andrea Currie, sculpture, painting, illustration
Mark Eliot Schwabe, steampunk wearable art and dollar door
Christy Mitchell, collage, photography, jewelry, lamps

‘Creemee’, by Studio Artist Martha Hull


‘Represent’ A Large Group Exhibition of Artists Showing in The S.P.A.C.E. Gallery and The Soda Plant, Art Hop through September 30, 2017:

Ali Moore, oil and acrylic
Andrew Prendimano, design markers, colored pencil, and dyes
Autumn Lee, photography
Barbee Hauzinger, collage
Chuck Niles, acrylic
Danielle Jatlow, ink on paper
David Magnanelli, digital art & illustration
David Russell, acrylic
Dorsey Hogg, book art
Elisa Freeman, paintings, prints & drawings
Eric Eickmann, painting, mixed media
Forrest White, stone & wood sculpture, custom skateboards
Frank DeAngelis, acrylics, spray paint mixed media
Frank Illo, steel & wood, illustration and painting
Hala Williams, acrylic
Helen Kagan, acrylic and giclee
Hilary Glass, prints and illustrations
Holly Friesen, acrylic and mixed media
House of LeMay, historical retrospective, mixed media
Howard Center Arts Collective, mixed media of various artists
Ikko-Ikki, mixed media, transparencies, wood
James Kobak, painting
Janet Bonneau, oil
Jeff Bruno & Nicole Christman, painting, mixed media
Julie Richards, photography
Lauren Mazzotta, photography
Longina Smolinski, paintings and ceramic sculpture
Mary Jo Krolewski, fiber sculptures
Matt Larson, mixed media, painting collages
Matt Morris, acrylic on canvas
Matthew Thorsen, photography
Max McCurdy, photography
Michael Farnsworth, photography on metal prints
Morgan Stark, mixed media sculpture
Nancy Tomczak, watercolor collage
Randy Ross, enamel on wood
Robert Waldo Brunelle, acrylic painting
Steve Sharon, acrylic on canvas
Tinka Martell, mized media paintings
Will Kasso Condry, acrylic, aerosol and oil
Yaeshua Ratti, mixed media, screenprinting

#1, enamel on panel by Randy Ross


Artist Market Booths and Displays for Art Hop Weekend

Jess Polanshek, pen and watercolor original illustrations and prints
Kristin Richland, acrylic and original drawings and prints
Lisa Pelletier, acrylic, painted glass windows and wine glasses
Nikki Laxar, mixed media, paintings, original illustrations and prints
Norman LaRock, found metal welded and painted sculpture
Ryan Brown, acrylic paintings
Sandra Brown, jewelry, painting, and mixed media

‘Words Can Be Unruly’, altered art book by Dorsey Hogg


Saturday Events

Matt Neckers –
The Vermont International Museum of Contemporary Art + Design is mobile miniature art museum located inside a 1960s era camper, and it includes hundreds of pieces of miniature artwork displayed in several galleries.

Matt Neckers, ‘Vermont International Mini-Contemporary Art Museum’

Jeff Howlett – 
Live Tintypes Booth, $50 a plate/tintype for Patrons of the Event
Introduced in the mid-19th century, each tintype photograph is individually created by coating, sensitizing, exposing and developing metal plate as the subject sits for the portrait session. Many Civil War era photographs were created with this historic technology, which provides a hauntingly beautiful and permanent image especially suitable for heirloom portraits of individuals, families, and bands.


While in The Soda Plant Check out Two Delicious Stops:
Celebrate The Soda Plant’s 100th Birthday! With a toast to the end of prohibition:

Alice and The Magician – A Cocktail Apothecary, Edible Fragrances and Boutique Cocktails

Venetian Ginger Ale – The Original Founder of the Building Designed and Bottled Ginger Ale…Now 100 years later, his great-great grandson, Justin Bunnell, is serving free samples of the newly re-launched, Venetian Ginger Ale, with 4-packs and merchandise for sale.


Enjoy Yourselves…Have Fun…Buy Art…& Tell Your Friends!

‘Sojourn’ – New Work by Sage Tucker-Ketcham and Dana Heffern

April First Friday Art Walk –
‘Sojourn’ at The S.P.A.C.E. Gallery

New Work By Sage Tucker-Ketcham and Dana Heffern

Curated By Wylie Sofia Garcia and Christy Mitchell

April 7 – 29, 2017

Opening Reception: First Friday Art Walk April 7, 5-9pm

‘Flat House’ by Dana Heffern, photography

Statement on ‘Soujourn’:

Temporality is the theme that unites new work by artists Sage Tucker-Ketcham and Dana Heffern. Evoking a sense of impermanence and longing these artists explore in painting and photographic media the double edge of loneliness: what it means to want to be alone and what it means to feel lonely. Tucker-Ketcham’s work focuses on the spatial relationships of objects in the form of a dialogue between entry-less houses and the manicured landscape. Where in Heffern’s, photographs ask the viewer to engage in categorizing the mundane to bring meaning to the otherwise overlooked landscape. In the duality of ‘Soujourn’, the artists use the landscape as a parallel between introspection and fantasy. This reflects that what one sometimes desires is not often the reality of what one experiences.

‘Lonely House’ by Sage Tucker-Ketcham, oil

Sage Tucker Ketcham’s new works are small, intimate and tangible oil paintings on stretched canvas. They’re primarily focused on using color and light to create balance and blur the line between observation and the abstraction of nature. Rolling hills, barns, houses, clouds, trees and the transition of season are part of each painting, not of an exact place but a reference to a place. They are personal narratives, a timeline and a reference to relationships, and a fantasy of place and a way of being. Each small painting is portable and becomes a personal object. They are an efficient cluster of communities in relation to the intentional quiet.

‘Broom’ by Dana Heffern, photography

Dana Heffern’s photographic work is a study of solitary places, overlooked snow detritus, and forgotten moments in time within winter. As a witness, Heffern testifies on behalf of the ignored and forgotten objects and landscapes that present to us in our everyday. The ordinary thing is often viewed as ugly or unworthy, but she sees the interstitial spaces people inhabit as divine. These spaces may go unrecognized, but they are the very glue that tethers us, as we sleepwalk through moments to whatever distraction comes next– these spaces will still be here as a lonely support that carries us from mundane reality to chosen fantasy.

‘House with Fence’ by Sage Tucker-Ketcham, oil

On View Through April 29th, 2017

The S.P.A.C.E. Gallery Hours: Thursday, Friday, Saturday from 12 – 5pm
Gallery Contact: Christy Mitchell, spacegalleryvt@gmail.com, (802) 578-2512

On View Now; ‘IRL’ by Christy Mitchell & ‘Artrocities’ by Frank DeAngelis

‘IRL’     

Multimedia works ‘In Real Life’ with Christy Mitchell

'IRL' of Christy Mitchell by Luke Awtry

‘IRL’ of Christy Mitchell by Luke Awtry

November 4 – 26, 2016
Open Thursdays – Saturdays from 12 – 5pm

Opening Reception;
First Friday Art Walk, November 4th 5 – 10pm

Romance in the digital age as a woman ‘seeking’ is a treasure trove of miscommunications and preconceived notions of what the perfect partner should be. It gives you a two-dimensional view into the hopes and fears of single (and sometimes not so single) potential partners, communicating in profiles both eloquent and idiotic. Taking the leap from speaking to strangers online to meeting ‘in real life’, Christy Mitchell documents the often vulnerable process with humor and grace through photography, video, and mixed media compositions taken from the computer screen.


‘Artrocities’     

Paintings by Frank DeAngelis (aka Frankie D.)

'Losing Head Over Heart' by Frank DeAngelis

‘Losing Head Over Heart’ by Frank DeAngelis

Frank DeAngelis in the Studio

Frank DeAngelis in the Studio

November 4 – 26, 2016
Opening Reception;
Frank DeAngelis began painting for the first time only 7 months ago and has been passionately addicted ever since. Fueled by loud music and heartache, his favorite time to create is after midnight alone in the studio. The work is raw and gritty, featuring the artists’ heartfelt imagination, angst, excitement and love in each brush stroke. Canvas edges are not framed or painted over, ‘Frankie D.’ states, “My artwork is imperfect, much like life itself.”

‘IRL’ In Real Life with Christy Mitchell – 7Days Review

Looking for Love in the Digital Age: An Art Show

Art Review by Rachel Elizabeth Jones, Sevendays Vermont

Christy Mitchell by Matthew Thorsen

Christy Mitchell opened Burlington’s S.P.A.C.E. Gallery in 2009, and every November since 2012 she has mounted her own solo show. Sandwiched between the annual “Art of Horror” group show and holiday-centric displays of affordable works, her exhibitions are unabashedly personal. This year, with “IRL” (“in real life”), Mitchell smartly digs into the world of online dating as a straight female, using a variety of media to process her encounters. Experiences limited to the internet and those taken to the next level meet in this exhibition.

Mitchell’s seven distinct bodies of work comment on the broader experiences of women seeking male partnership in the digital age. But they also have an inherently place-based component, since Mitchell lives and works — and therefore sets her Tinder location — in Burlington.

“Tinder has a different application here than in New York City,” Mitchell says. The nuances of online dating in a rural area shine through in “Photo Friendly,” a series of framed images gleaned from user profiles and screenshots from singles platforms Tinder and OkCupid. Vermont users are no doubt familiar with seeing their faces in Tinder’s graphic epicenter accompanied by the text “There’s no one new around you.” Mitchell has placed her own small screenshot within the multiphoto frame.

Urban women are less likely to see that message — or so many photos of men posing with fish. Vermont Tinder is rampant with those images, Mitchell says — as if fishing were a de rigueur display of manliness here. A cluster of heart-shaped brass frames within “Photo Friendly” offers up such fishy screenshots. “Twenty percent of [their] profile is a fish,” Mitchell comments, “which says,Love me with this fish. He comes with the fish.”

In some parts of Vermont, Burlington included, setting one’s Tinder distance preferences to the maximum 100-mile radius means getting “access” to site members in Montréal.

For Mitchell, a digitally initiated friendship with a man in the Québec metropolis sparked the photo series “Prince Charming Has a Foot Fetish.” The two shared approximately 5,000 messages over a three-month period, Mitchell reveals, during which he revealed his sexual proclivity for feet. In six photographs taken of Mitchell by local photographer Luke Awtry — whom she also met on Tinder — she cleverly melds her own search for romance with the story of Cinderella.

prince-charming-has-a-foot-fetish

Prince Charming Has A Foot Fetish, Christy Mitchell by Luke Awtry

For the photographs, Mitchell used fishnet stockings, a no-frills blue dress and a pair of aptly named Public Desire clear plastic boots (aka glass slippers) as props. In some photos, she places herself in an ambiguous, attic-like space, confined like the Cinder girl. The underlying sentiment that modern love is no fairy tale is cleverly subverted by the suggestion that a fairy tale is also no fairy tale. Waiting to be “rescued” by love may be boring, high heels make your feet hurt, and Prince Charming may have unexpected tastes. Mitchell writes in her exhibition text: “In this case, the real Prince Charming can be perceived as the artist herself, creating an internal dialog of what it means to be desired and finding love within her own mind and creative meanderings.”

As a viewer takes in the “Prince Charming” series, the 15-foot-wide projection “Photobooth Façade” plays on a loop on the gallery’s blank wall. Hundreds of Mitchell’s computer selfies fly by, from sultry, red-lipsticked poses to full-on goofball faces. Of the hundreds, Mitchell reports, she put only 10 into play on her dating profiles. The piece speaks to the often funny, vulnerable and embarrassing reality of self-creation and curation when one is looking for love.

Humor is a crucial element of the exhibition, balancing a sense of frustration with a healthy appreciation for the absurd. In “IRL,” Awtry captures Mitchell in the “bar scene,” smoking and wearing a gorilla mask. “Little Black Book” is a “talking photo album” issued by RadioShack circa 2005, which Mitchell has filled with upbeat stock photography of couples and groups smiling in various locations — with a puppy in bed, having drinks at a bar. When you press a photo’s corresponding button, a computer voice reads messages that Mitchell — or, in one case, her friend — received on dating platforms. These range from relatively innocuous lines about sushi to words of male frustration or sexual aggression, such as “Let me lick. Let me lick. Let me lick. Let me lick.”

“Wash That Man Right Out” encapsulates the understated humor of surrealist objects in a way reminiscent of Swiss artist Méret Oppenheim’s iconic 1936 “Object,” a fur-covered teacup saucer and spoon. For “Wash,” Mitchell replaced the cord and speaker of an old-fashioned rotary phone with a long braid of synthetic blond hair and a Lucite showerhead. The piece is named for the 1949 song “I’m Gonna Wash That Man Right Outa My Hair,” written by Rodgers and Hammerstein for the Broadway musical South Pacific. Some visitors, Mitchell says, have seen in the piece a gesture toward the “synthetic communication that we’re getting these days.”

She notes that as she constructed the exhibition, her own online dating shifted to a process of “research and documentation.” By entwining her art practice and her romantic life, Mitchell has created a space for herself and others to consider the gender roles, rituals and vulnerabilities, new and old, that have emerged on the digital dating frontier.

What is love, anyway? It’s hard to say, but Mitchell offers this: “Love in the digital age is very difficult.”