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    Located within The Soda Plant @ Kilburn and Pine Streets in Burlington, Vermont

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    The SPACE Gallery
    266 Pine Street
    Burlington, VT
    spacegalleryvt@gmail.com
    802-578-2512
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‘Conjuring: She Rises’ May 5-27, 2017

May 2017 Exhibition –
‘Conjuring: She Rises’

13 Female Artists Communicate Power Through Art

May 5 – 27, 2017
Open Thursday – Saturday from 12-5pm

Opening Reception: First Friday Art Walk May 5, 5-9pm

Performances Start at 7:30pm by The Accaliae and Throat of The Loon followed by a ritual circle led by Morgan Stark.

A Spell To End Strife, Beth Robinson

Statement on ‘Conjuring: She Rises’:

325 years ago, the Salem Witch Trials were an example of a hysteria that people can experience when faced with fear. Witch hunts, whether hunting actual witches, or not, are a serious global threat. Conjuring: She Rises is a group show of 13 artists in honor of the anniversary of the Salem Witch Trial. These artists use art as a political agent of change to reclaim the power of vulnerability over terror.

She Dreams, Wylie Garcia


Participating Artists:

Beth Robinson
Leslie Fry
Athena Kafantaris
Christy Mitchell
Wylie Garcia
Sarah Vogelsang-Card
Meredith Muse
Morgan Stark
Nyx Black
Melaney Pettini
Leslie Roth
Annika Rundberg
Nikki Laxar

Design Support By:
Abigail Feldman

Ashes, Athena Kafantaris

On View Through May 27th, 2017

The S.P.A.C.E. Gallery Hours: Thursday, Friday, Saturday from 12 – 5pm
Gallery Contact: Christy Mitchell, spacegalleryvt@gmail.com, (802) 578-2512

‘Sojourn’ – New Work by Sage Tucker-Ketcham and Dana Heffern

April First Friday Art Walk –
‘Sojourn’ at The S.P.A.C.E. Gallery

New Work By Sage Tucker-Ketcham and Dana Heffern

Curated By Wylie Sofia Garcia and Christy Mitchell

April 7 – 29, 2017

Opening Reception: First Friday Art Walk April 7, 5-9pm

‘Flat House’ by Dana Heffern, photography

Statement on ‘Soujourn’:

Temporality is the theme that unites new work by artists Sage Tucker-Ketcham and Dana Heffern. Evoking a sense of impermanence and longing these artists explore in painting and photographic media the double edge of loneliness: what it means to want to be alone and what it means to feel lonely. Tucker-Ketcham’s work focuses on the spatial relationships of objects in the form of a dialogue between entry-less houses and the manicured landscape. Where in Heffern’s, photographs ask the viewer to engage in categorizing the mundane to bring meaning to the otherwise overlooked landscape. In the duality of ‘Soujourn’, the artists use the landscape as a parallel between introspection and fantasy. This reflects that what one sometimes desires is not often the reality of what one experiences.

‘Lonely House’ by Sage Tucker-Ketcham, oil

Sage Tucker Ketcham’s new works are small, intimate and tangible oil paintings on stretched canvas. They’re primarily focused on using color and light to create balance and blur the line between observation and the abstraction of nature. Rolling hills, barns, houses, clouds, trees and the transition of season are part of each painting, not of an exact place but a reference to a place. They are personal narratives, a timeline and a reference to relationships, and a fantasy of place and a way of being. Each small painting is portable and becomes a personal object. They are an efficient cluster of communities in relation to the intentional quiet.

‘Broom’ by Dana Heffern, photography

Dana Heffern’s photographic work is a study of solitary places, overlooked snow detritus, and forgotten moments in time within winter. As a witness, Heffern testifies on behalf of the ignored and forgotten objects and landscapes that present to us in our everyday. The ordinary thing is often viewed as ugly or unworthy, but she sees the interstitial spaces people inhabit as divine. These spaces may go unrecognized, but they are the very glue that tethers us, as we sleepwalk through moments to whatever distraction comes next– these spaces will still be here as a lonely support that carries us from mundane reality to chosen fantasy.

‘House with Fence’ by Sage Tucker-Ketcham, oil

On View Through April 29th, 2017

The S.P.A.C.E. Gallery Hours: Thursday, Friday, Saturday from 12 – 5pm
Gallery Contact: Christy Mitchell, spacegalleryvt@gmail.com, (802) 578-2512

‘Art of Winter’ – February 3 – April 1, 2017

‘Art of Winter’
February 3rd – April 1, 2017

First Friday Art Reception: March 3rd, 5-9PM

Gallery Hours: Thursday – Saturday, 12-5pm

Themes in the exhibition include representations of the landscape and flora in winter, renderings of ice on Lake Champlain, changes to natural landmarks, storytelling through painting, representations of space and time, abstract and psychological ideas about winter, and winter as sculpture.

Perseverance, acrylic, by Tomomi Ueda

Perseverance, acrylic, by Tomomi Ueda

The exhibition is curated by The S.P.A.C.E. Gallery director Christy Mitchell and Ric Kasini Kadour, editor and publisher of the Vermont Art Guide. “Art of Winter” exists in two forms: A physical exhibition of artwork by 26 artists will be on display at SPACE Gallery, along with an exhibition in print with artwork by 19 artists is included in Vermont Art Guide #3.

Artists include: Alex Costantino, Ashley Roark, Christy Mitchell, Stella Ehrich, Doris Bergeron, Frankie D. (DeAngelis), Tomomi Ueda, Sherri Rigby, Elaine Ittleman, Carol Crosby, Linda Di Sante, Kate Longmaid, Karyn Neubauer, Shona Sladyk, Jan Fowler, Julie Davis, Lorraine C Manley, Nitya Brighenti, June Campbell, Sharon Webster, Erika Lawlor Schmidt, Linda Van Cooper, Martha Hull, Robert Waldo Brunelle JR, Samantha M. Eckert, and Shalvah Herzberg.
December, collage and thread, by Erika Lawlor Schmidt

December, collage and thread, by Erika Lawlor Schmidt


About Art of Winter
The snowflake photographer Wilson Bentley (1865-1931) wrote, “The farm folks, up in this north country, dread the winter; but I was supremely happy, from the day of the first snowfall-which usually came in November-until the last one, which sometimes came as late as May.” At some point in the 20th century, winter in Vermont stopped being a thing of dread, when one dug in and hoped food supplies would last, the well wouldn’t freeze, and nature would be merciful. It was probably sometime in the 1930’s, when Dartmouth ski coach Wallace “Bunny” Bertram tied a tow rope to a Model-T Ford engine and started pulling skiers up a hill on Gilbert’s Farm in Woodstock. Winter started being a time of wonder, pleasure, and frolic.
Artists paint the world around them and it should be no surprise that winter is a frequent theme for Vermont artists. This exhibition is a survey of such artworks. Vermont has a long, rich tradition of painting the landscape. En plein air and in the studio artists forage the state for scenes to reproduce on canvas and board. Many of the works are representations of the land. Cartooning and storytelling also plays a role in Vermont art and artworks that engage these traditions are also present. We find artists engaging the psychology of winter in artwork that trades on mood, memory, and representations of the psyche.

“Art of Winter” is an opportunity for viewers to consider the role this season plays in our lives. One cannot ignore winter. It demands our attention. It forces us to dress differently, to spend resources heating our homes, and to develop an outlook, a personal philosophy, that will get us through until the ice melts, air warms, and life springs from the ground.

Sumac in Moonlight, oil on gesso board, by Shona Sladyk

Sumac in Moonlight, oil on gesso board, by Shona Sladyk


About The S.P.A.C.E. Gallery
S.P.A.C.E stands for Supportive Places for Artists and the Creative Economy. Formerly the Soda Plant Artist Collective Environment, S.P.A.C.E has a mission to create an accessible venue for showing, viewing, and making artwork by the public in Vermont and beyond. By combining creative endeavors with industrial reuse, S.P.A.C.E contributes to the economic revitalization of the industrial South End of Burlington – and beyond!
About Vermont Art Guide
Vermont Art Guide is a quarterly, printed magazine about contemporary art in Vermont. We offer a curated list of places to see art and publish profiles on artists, art venues, and public art. Each issue is a celebration of the state’s great art scene. Vermont Art Guide is a project of Kasini House. www.vermontartguide.com

‘IRL’ In Real Life with Christy Mitchell – 7Days Review

Looking for Love in the Digital Age: An Art Show

Art Review by Rachel Elizabeth Jones, Sevendays Vermont

Christy Mitchell by Matthew Thorsen

Christy Mitchell opened Burlington’s S.P.A.C.E. Gallery in 2009, and every November since 2012 she has mounted her own solo show. Sandwiched between the annual “Art of Horror” group show and holiday-centric displays of affordable works, her exhibitions are unabashedly personal. This year, with “IRL” (“in real life”), Mitchell smartly digs into the world of online dating as a straight female, using a variety of media to process her encounters. Experiences limited to the internet and those taken to the next level meet in this exhibition.

Mitchell’s seven distinct bodies of work comment on the broader experiences of women seeking male partnership in the digital age. But they also have an inherently place-based component, since Mitchell lives and works — and therefore sets her Tinder location — in Burlington.

“Tinder has a different application here than in New York City,” Mitchell says. The nuances of online dating in a rural area shine through in “Photo Friendly,” a series of framed images gleaned from user profiles and screenshots from singles platforms Tinder and OkCupid. Vermont users are no doubt familiar with seeing their faces in Tinder’s graphic epicenter accompanied by the text “There’s no one new around you.” Mitchell has placed her own small screenshot within the multiphoto frame.

Urban women are less likely to see that message — or so many photos of men posing with fish. Vermont Tinder is rampant with those images, Mitchell says — as if fishing were a de rigueur display of manliness here. A cluster of heart-shaped brass frames within “Photo Friendly” offers up such fishy screenshots. “Twenty percent of [their] profile is a fish,” Mitchell comments, “which says,Love me with this fish. He comes with the fish.”

In some parts of Vermont, Burlington included, setting one’s Tinder distance preferences to the maximum 100-mile radius means getting “access” to site members in Montréal.

For Mitchell, a digitally initiated friendship with a man in the Québec metropolis sparked the photo series “Prince Charming Has a Foot Fetish.” The two shared approximately 5,000 messages over a three-month period, Mitchell reveals, during which he revealed his sexual proclivity for feet. In six photographs taken of Mitchell by local photographer Luke Awtry — whom she also met on Tinder — she cleverly melds her own search for romance with the story of Cinderella.

prince-charming-has-a-foot-fetish

Prince Charming Has A Foot Fetish, Christy Mitchell by Luke Awtry

For the photographs, Mitchell used fishnet stockings, a no-frills blue dress and a pair of aptly named Public Desire clear plastic boots (aka glass slippers) as props. In some photos, she places herself in an ambiguous, attic-like space, confined like the Cinder girl. The underlying sentiment that modern love is no fairy tale is cleverly subverted by the suggestion that a fairy tale is also no fairy tale. Waiting to be “rescued” by love may be boring, high heels make your feet hurt, and Prince Charming may have unexpected tastes. Mitchell writes in her exhibition text: “In this case, the real Prince Charming can be perceived as the artist herself, creating an internal dialog of what it means to be desired and finding love within her own mind and creative meanderings.”

As a viewer takes in the “Prince Charming” series, the 15-foot-wide projection “Photobooth Façade” plays on a loop on the gallery’s blank wall. Hundreds of Mitchell’s computer selfies fly by, from sultry, red-lipsticked poses to full-on goofball faces. Of the hundreds, Mitchell reports, she put only 10 into play on her dating profiles. The piece speaks to the often funny, vulnerable and embarrassing reality of self-creation and curation when one is looking for love.

Humor is a crucial element of the exhibition, balancing a sense of frustration with a healthy appreciation for the absurd. In “IRL,” Awtry captures Mitchell in the “bar scene,” smoking and wearing a gorilla mask. “Little Black Book” is a “talking photo album” issued by RadioShack circa 2005, which Mitchell has filled with upbeat stock photography of couples and groups smiling in various locations — with a puppy in bed, having drinks at a bar. When you press a photo’s corresponding button, a computer voice reads messages that Mitchell — or, in one case, her friend — received on dating platforms. These range from relatively innocuous lines about sushi to words of male frustration or sexual aggression, such as “Let me lick. Let me lick. Let me lick. Let me lick.”

“Wash That Man Right Out” encapsulates the understated humor of surrealist objects in a way reminiscent of Swiss artist Méret Oppenheim’s iconic 1936 “Object,” a fur-covered teacup saucer and spoon. For “Wash,” Mitchell replaced the cord and speaker of an old-fashioned rotary phone with a long braid of synthetic blond hair and a Lucite showerhead. The piece is named for the 1949 song “I’m Gonna Wash That Man Right Outa My Hair,” written by Rodgers and Hammerstein for the Broadway musical South Pacific. Some visitors, Mitchell says, have seen in the piece a gesture toward the “synthetic communication that we’re getting these days.”

She notes that as she constructed the exhibition, her own online dating shifted to a process of “research and documentation.” By entwining her art practice and her romantic life, Mitchell has created a space for herself and others to consider the gender roles, rituals and vulnerabilities, new and old, that have emerged on the digital dating frontier.

What is love, anyway? It’s hard to say, but Mitchell offers this: “Love in the digital age is very difficult.”

August First Friday Art Walk – Celebrate 85 Years of the NVAA Member Exhibition

August 2016 at Space: ‘NVAA Member Exhibition’

Return of the Prodigal Cows by David Goodrich

Return of the Prodigal Cows by David Goodrich


“NVAA at Space Gallery”      
Northern Vermont Arts Association Member Exhibition    

Exhibition Duration; August 5 – 27, 2016

Opening Reception; First Friday Art Walk, August 1 from 5 – 9pm

The Northern Vermont Artist Association was founded right here in Burlington, VT in 1931 by Harold S. Knight and a group of Vermont artists in search of venues for their art. One of the first members of this new art organization was the renowned American painter, Maxfield Parrish.

Waterfall by Maxfield Parrish, shown during the first NVAA Member exhibition in 1931

Waterfall by Maxfield Parrish, shown during the first NVAA Member exhibition in 1931

From 1932 through 1972 the NVAA held its annual show at the Robert Hull Fleming Museum at UVM. Exhibitions have since moved around Vermont in locations large enough for the membership. Over the last 85 years, many important Vermont artists have exhibited their work in one or more of these shows, including Francis Colburn, Ruth Mould, Stan Marc Wright, Emile Gruppe, Mary and Alden Bryan and Roy Kennedy.

Today, in addition to its venerable annual June show, the NVAA offers its members the opportunity to show their work in many lovely locations. Showing for the first time at The Space Gallery this August, the NVAA celebrates 85 years, right here with us in the heart of the South End Arts District in Burlington.


The S.P.A.C.E. Gallery & The Backspace Gallery
266 Pine Street, Suite 105 & 106
Burlington, VT
(802) 578-2512
www.spacegalleryvt.com
Gallery Hours; Weds – Sat 12 – 5pm