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    Located within The Soda Plant @ Kilburn and Pine Streets in Burlington, Vermont

    Watch for our Space Man mural!

    The SPACE Gallery
    266 Pine Street
    Burlington, VT
    spacegalleryvt@gmail.com
    802-578-2512
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‘Avalon’ Closing Reception + Artist Talk by Alex Costantino

‘Avalon’ by Alex Costantino

First Friday Artwalk, August 3rd

Closing Reception from 5-8pm

Artist Talk at 7pm


‘East Island Tracts’, 3-D landscape installation by Alex Costantino

‘Avalon’
Landscape Installations by Alex Costantino
NOW’S YOUR CHANCE! Check out this unique exhibition for the first time or visit again to hear the talented Alex Costantino speak about the work, material, process, and concept behind ‘Avalon’, August 3rd at 7pm.
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In the better half of the 21st century, in the middle of a glacier-carved lake in the hilly north edge of a certain green, mountainous state, there is an island village called Avalon. It exists after scarcity, with a peculiar continuity to its past as a lumber milling center and a summertime retreat for farther-flung wealth. Avalon is a portrait of a particular rural future, one in which the questions of life in the outer edges of a wealthy, deeply unequal society have been answered in unexpected ways.

 

The world of Avalon is partially one of technological post scarcity, with much of the challenge of keeping everyone housed and clothed solved by careful and efficient extraction of the means of keeping all people housed, clothed, and fed using technologies most analogous to contemporary rapid prototyping, made democratically cheap and ubiquitous, but also changes in society, locally and throughout this global future, of more free and more equal distribution not only of the technology at issue, but the knowledge and means to use it. It hasn’t meant that there are no clerks, or farmers, or teachers on Avalon, but that none of them really want for anything.

The project of Avalon comes from a desire to see a future for the world we live in, one not mired in dystopias that warn us against our worst possible todays without pointing toward the better world that is indeed possible. It’s particularly pressed on by a desire to see a future that isn’t characterized by the bleeding edge of the technologically and culturally possible we see in most speculative fiction, one centered on the great cosmopolitan global cities or interplanetary frontiers, but one that can be envisioned in the small, aging towns, the remote and currently-shrinking places that have and likely will be receiving the future’s distribution second and third-hand.

 

‘Lighthouse Island’, three dimensional landscape installation by Alex Costantino

June 2018: ‘You Know What I Mean?’

You Know What I Mean?

June 1 – 30, 2018
Opening Reception: First Friday Art Walk, June 1st from 5 – 9pm

Longina Smolinski – ‘Running Into Yourself (2)’, acrylic on canvas

Modern day interactions with peers in social settings are often ripe with conversations that are meant to validate thoughts and reactions to daily occurrences. In a search for affirmation one party may ask, “You know what I mean?”

This question may be construed as a statement, seeking a confirmation rather than debate.

Blake Larsen – ‘Untitled 3’, acrylic on 140lb papier d’arche

The artist, while creating, is having a conversation with the piece in hand. Ultimately, the artwork is meant to serve as a statement to the future viewer, of which interpretations are limitless. Throughout history, abstract paintings often comment on an underlying subject matter or cultural reference.

Dan Siegel – ‘The Fountains’, acrylic on panel

‘You Know What I Mean?’ as an exhibition wants to be subjectless, though meaning can be found in all visual art if you look and think hard enough. The goal of The Space Gallery this June is to encourage the viewer to push back and see if they can in fact answer the question at hand, presented uniquely by each artist.

Ashley Roark, ‘Full Stop’, acrylic gouache on panel

Featuring work by:
Ashley Roark
Blake Larsen
Dan Siegel
Longina Smolinski
Steve Sharon

Steve Sharon, ‘In Bloom’, acrylic on canvas

April 2018: ‘Home Works’ by Kylie Dally and Corrine Yonce

Home Works

by Kylie Dally and Corrine Yonce

April 6 – 28, 2018

Opening Reception:
First Friday Art Walk, April 6th from 5 – 9pm


In honor of the anniversary of the passing of the Fair Housing Act and in remembrance of the assassination of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in 1968, April is set aside as National Fair Housing Month.

2018 coincides with the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act. Former President Lyndon Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1968, signing fair housing into law.

“Now, with this bill, the voice of justice speaks again,” Johnson said
as he signed the bill. “It proclaims that fair housing for all, all
human beings who live in this country, is now part of the American way of life.”


 

‘Guy Salvomini, South Burlington Community Housing’ acrylic on masonite by Corrine Yonce

This April, The Space Gallery is honored to show the wonderful work of Kylie Dally and Corrine Yonce who have created paintings of, with, and for the residents of Burlington Housing Authority.

‘Wharf Lane Community Painting’ with Kylie Dally

With the guidance of Kylie Dally, a series of nature paintings were created with residents of Wharf Lane Apartments in Burlington as a way to connect them with nature, art, and community. Utilizing plants sourced in the area, the work is to be permanently installed in their building this summer.

Residents wanted art, colorful walls, and to have some control over the appearance of their living environment, and with the financial assistance of a Burlington City Arts Community Fund Grant, the work has done just that.

‘Debra Pratt, Decker Towers’ acrylic on masonite by Corrine Yonce

Corrine Yonce’s series, ‘Voices of Home’ combines the audio narratives and painted portraits of affordable housing residents of Decker Towers and South Burlington Community Housing. The result is vibrant work that demonstrates the importance of safe, healthy, and affordable homes.

Yonce has received support for the project from Burlington City Arts, the Vermont Arts Council, Fair Housing Vermont, Curtis Lumber and worked in collaboration with Vermont Affordable Housing Coalition. She is currently the artist in resident at New City Gallery on Church Street, Burlington.

‘Warf Lane Community Painting’ with Kylie Dally

‘Home Works’
On View April 6 – 28, 2018
Gallery Hours: Thursday – Saturday 12 – 5pm

March 2018: ‘In The Moment’ collage work by Ashley Roark, Barbee Hauzinger, and Christy Mitchell

In The Moment

Collage Work by Ashley Roark, Barbee Hauzinger, and Christy Mitchell

March 2 – 31, 2018

Opening Reception:
First Friday Art Walk, March 2nd from 5 – 9pm

Collage by Barbee Hauzinger – ‘In Search of the Waganauts’

Ashley Roark, Barbee Hauzinger, and Christy Mitchell have much in common; females in their thirties creating collage artwork…though their styles range from minimalism to conceptual, crossing a wide spectrum of time and eras with their materials and visual media.

Collage by Ashley Roark – ‘Balances’

Ashley Roark sees paper as a place holder for memories. These assemblages create a language through the layering and manipulation of materials. Roark uses inspiration from typography to create form, space and movement. Her work utilizes vintage paper, acrylic paint, gouache, graphite, and wax. This new series illustrates Roark’s current experimentation with an expanded color palette, adding new elements of pale pink and sienna to her traditionally muted tones.

Collage by Barbee Hauzinger – ‘LIFE Magazine September 14, 1962’

Barbee Hauzinger uses collage as a way to actualize a landscape, a scene, and a place in time that could never be captured through her other creative passion, photography, exclusively with paper from vintage books and magazines.

In her ‘Where You’d Want to Be Series’, Hauzinger creates familiar yet curious scenes; snapshots that exude a sense of strange sense of nostalgia for the viewer.  The landscapes themselves are beautiful; star studded skies, ethereal heavenly bodies, pristine wildernesses. Yet there is something eerie and off about them, like these places may just be too good to be true.

The second series, ‘Age of Ads’ goes about dissecting and exploring American consumerism and commercialism through the use of ads from a single piece of print material. The piece featured above from this series uses only one magazine, LIFE Magazine September 14, 1962, dissecting the moment in time to one message; utopia can be created if you just buy the correct products.

Collage by Christy Mitchell – ‘Traffic Jam Uptown’ (detail)

Christy Mitchell creates a sense of nostalgia in her collages through the use of color and imagery printed in magazines from the late 40’s – early 70’s, though the artist herself never lived in those decades. Her choice of settings and the people depicted appear as if in a scene or a still of an imagined movie. Utilizing media from those specific eras, the content was ‘of the moment’ in those years, though when placed in fresh compositions the work takes on a new life, commenting on broader implications of our current place within society and with each other. The work is at times comforting, as though you could just go back ‘there’, paired with a voice in the back of your head, asking, ‘are you sure that you want to?’

In The Moment
On View March 2 – 31, 2018
Gallery Hours: Thursday – Saturday 12 – 5pm

October 2017 Exhibition, ‘Dark Matter’

Dark Matter

A Juried Dark Arts Exhibition
October 6 – 28, 2017

‘En Route III’, oil on wood panel, by Lydia Gatzow

Opening Reception First Friday Art Walk
October 6th from 5-9pm

‘Dark Matter’, in a scientific sense, has never been directly observed; however, its existence would explain a number of otherwise puzzling astronomical observations. We’ve asked artists to consider how existence and puzzling realities…and fantasies, play in to their own work and interpretation of the universe.

‘Monday Vibes’,
acrylic, latex, mixed media on slate by Jackie Bishop

Do you feel that we may be in the new ‘dark ages’ with regards to our environment or political climate? The work in this exhibition asks you, the viewer as well, to consider the broader ideas of the human and cultural experience.

‘When Silence is Betrayal’, pigment ink framed print by Matt Larson $150 (100% of artist’s proceeds to Black Lives Matter Vermont)

This exhibition is extraordinary! We are looking forward to showing you. See you on First Friday Art Walk and all month long!

The Space Gallery Open Hours: Thursday – Saturday 12-5pm
October 6 – 28, 2017

August 2017 Exhibition: 86th Annual NVAA Member Show

NVAA: Northern Vermont Arts Association 
86th Annual Member Exhibition    

August 4 – 26, 2017

Opening Reception; First Friday Art Walk, August 4 from 5 – 9pm

‘Riders’ by Nancy J. Hayden, Current NVAA Member

The Northern Vermont Artist Association was founded right here in Burlington, VT in 1931 by Harold S. Knight and a group of Vermont artists in search of venues for their art. One of the first members of this new art organization was the renowned American painter, Maxfield Parrish.

‘Waterfall’ by Maxfield Parrish, shown during the first NVAA Member exhibition in 1931

From 1931 through 1972 the NVAA held its annual member show at the Robert Hull Fleming Museum at UVM. Exhibitions have since moved around Vermont in locations large enough for the membership. Over the last 86 years, many important Vermont artists have exhibited their work in one or more of these shows, including Francis Colburn, Ruth Mould, Stan Marc Wright, Emile Gruppe, Mary and Alden Bryan and Roy Kennedy.

‘First Light Cape Cod’, by Andy Brown, Current NVAA Member

Today, the NVAA offers its members the opportunity to show their work in many lovely locations, and for the second annual exhibition in August, here in the heart of the South End Arts District at The Space Gallery in Burlington.
The S.P.A.C.E. Gallery
266 Pine Street, Suite 105
Burlington, VT
(802) 578-2512
www.spacegalleryvt.com
Gallery Hours; Thurs – Sat 12 – 5pm

June 2017 Exhibition – Peter Richards

Solo Exhibitions for First Friday Art Walk!

Opening Reception: Friday, June 2 from 5 – 9pm
Exhibition Duration: June 2 – July 1, 2017

The S.P.A.C.E. Gallery:
‘A Hair in the Stars and Grass’
by Peter Richards

Peter Richards – ‘If I Remember Those Seas Out of Kenai’

The Backspace Gallery:
‘Character Witness’
by Alex Costantino

Alex Costantino – ‘Resilience’

A pair of prolific studio members of The Backspace Gallery, Peter Richards and Alex Costantino, launch exciting solo exhibitions to kick off this June’s First Friday Art Walk!
With the loss of our auxiliary gallery, The Backspace, in June, this will be our last First Friday Art Reception in there…so don’t miss it!
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‘A Hair in the Stars and Grass’
Peter Richards
June 2 – July 1, 2017

In this new work I want each piece to tell a story, but with only the aura of a story and perhaps its setting doing the telling. I enjoy reading stories and so I’m interested in the ways stories evoke, transport, and enlist the reader into adventures built more out of atmosphere, tone, and voice, than what is ostensibly narrative. While events in life are important, I find it curious, and perhaps it stands as a rule—a great novel is great always despite it’s story. So I look in this new work to explore the question— outside of figure, what are some of the utilities a painting enjoys for creating realities that are at once habitable, intimate, and convincing, I’m also curious about the activity that exists somewhere in the overlap between viewing a painting and reading a text. I like to populate my paintings (suggestively) with what might be perceived as purely imaginary letters, and from alphabets and languages that are equally imagined. Imagined, but are they real? and if so, what are the semiotic, aesthetic, and spatial consequences when such lettering presents itself as not only imaginary, but also biological in form, and sentient in disposition? For me the question occurs simultaneous with the painting becoming embryonic in its outcome, and perhaps even still astral yet in the stage and mode it presents itself to the viewer. And as much as I want my painting to each one tell the particular story of how it came into being, it’s also true I wish for the viewer’s attention to absorb into the painting as one of its happily imagined, and living constituents.

Peter Richards – ‘The Slips’

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‘Character Witness’
Alex Costantino
May 27 – June 3, 2017

Although these are images riddled and defined by abstraction, still they are images of human beings experiencing change, life, transformation. They are meant at once to be paintings- objects concerned with their own materiality and the manner of their creation- as well as communions of artist and subject. What makes them portraits is, as much as anything, that they are not the human beings they represent.

Every portrait is a fiction, just as every painting is simultaneously an engagement with a subject and, in itself, an inert object. Whether full scale nudes or merely a pair of hands, these paintings are meant to capture some measure of an individual- some measure of the subjects’ emotional residue, of their physical presence, of their life lived apart from being a subject. And because these paintings depict people through varied ages and stages of life, these pictures communicate that transition. Each one is being, and becoming.

Alex Costantino – ‘Domenica’

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Gallery Hours: Thursday, Friday, Saturday from 12 – 5pm

The S.P.A.C.E. Gallery
266 Pine Street, Suite 105, Burlington, VT
See you soon, enjoy!